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The Greatest Is Love audio

The Greatest Is Love

Romans 12:9-16 (p. 1764)                                                            November 19, 2017    

Love must be sincere.   Hate what is evil; cling to what is good.
Romans 12:9

Intro:  1) Paul’s “love chapters” are connected to use of gifts, not husbands/wives
2) for the rest of Romans, Paul is placing love in the context of
— the kairos moment à persecution, government, “this present time” (13:11), and conflict
— Paul is preparing us to “accept one another” when it is difficult

Defining “love”

Love must be sincere . . . .
Be devoted to one another in brotherly love.
Honor one another above yourselves.  Never be lacking in zeal,
but keep your spiritual fervor, serving the Lord.
Romans 12:10-11

 

  1. Love is THE WAY I USE MY SPIRITUAL GIFTS

 

  1. Love is ALWAYS TOWARD THE OTHER

 

  1. Love is MY LIVING SACRIFICE (go back to Romans 12:1-2!)

 

Love is a participle (sorry, dc talk)

Be joyful . . . . .    Be patient . . . .     Be faithful . . . .
Sharing . . . .    Pursuing . . . .
Romans 12:12-14

 

  1. Love is first something I AM

 

  1. Love reflects the very HEART OF GOD

 

  1. Love requires PARTICIPATION = SHARING

 

Pursued and Pursuing

Practice hospitality.   Bless those who persecute you, bless and do not curse.
Romans 12:13-14

 

  1. HOSPITALITY doesn’t just happen

 

  1. This love requires ME to reach out first

— Philippians 4:2-4 –> who is going to flinch, Euodia or Syntyche?

— Romans 5:1-8

 

 

Doug’s translation of Romans 12:9-16

Love [must be] genuine.

hating the evil,

being joined to the good,

lovingly affectionate in brotherly love to one another,

in honor [toward one another] outdoing one another,

in diligence not [being] troublesome,

in the spirit boiling over,

to the Lord being a slave,

in the hope rejoicing,

in the tribulation enduring,

in the prayer being consistent,

to the needs of the saints being a sharer,

[and] pursuing the love of the stranger.

Bless (or, “speak well of”) the one pursing [you].

Bless (or, “speak well of”) and stop cursing,

to rejoice with the one rejoicing,

to weep with the one weeping,

thinking the same thing toward one another,

not thinking highly

but to the humble being led together.

Stop becoming wise according to yourselves.

 

More study resources for Romans 12

Tim Browning’s message “Not Puffed Up” at https://www.
monergism.com/thethreshold/articles/onsite/mp3/076%20Romans%2012.03-08.pdf

Bob Deffinbaugh’s  sermon “This Thing Called Love” at https://
bible.org/seriespage/30-thinking-straight-about-spiritual-gifts-romans-123-8

Ligon Duncan’s message “A Call to Humility” at https://www.fpcjackson.org/resource-library/sermons/a-call-to-humility-and-service

Michael Horton’s “Romans from 30,000 Feet” from “An Overview of the Book of Romans”, http://www.reformationtheology.com/2011/04/romans_from_30000_feet_by_mich.php

Sinclair Ferguson’s “The Great Exchanges” at http://www.ligonier.org/blog/great-exchanges-romans/

F.F. Bruce’s paraphrase of Romans at https://biblicalstudies.org.
uk/pdf/eq/1958-2_bruce.pdf
  or Paternoster Press (1965); Paul: Apostle of the Heart Set Free (Eerdmans, 1977); and The Epistle of Paul to the Romans (Eerdmans, 1963).

Tim Keller’s Romans For You (The Good Book, 2014).

William Hendriksen’s Romans in BNTC (Baker Books, 1980).

James Boice’s Romans, Volume 4, (Baker Books, 1991).

Earl Palmer’s Romans series notes “The Greatest Book”, Winter 2002, University Presbyterian Church, Seattle, Washington.

Reading this week: Reconciliation and Thanksgiving

At our last Pathway Learning Community, our coach shared his passion for stewardship and generosity in discipleship (see the Vitality Pathway’s eighth Missional Marker, Sacrificial and generous living).  Pastor Phil encouraged us to consider this challenge in 2 Corinthians, and Thanksgiving Week is a great time to accept the challenge!

Monday: 2 Corinthians 5:1-10, “For this very purpose”
We are designed for eternity.  How is God preparing your “earthly tent” for that “eternal house”?  Where are you seeing the eternal break out in your life?

Tuesday: 2Corinthians 5:11-6:2, New Creation
We are compelled to ministry by Christ’s love.  Where are you celebrating the “new creation” experience?  To what ministry of reconciliation is God opening doors for you right now?

Wednesday: 2 Corinthians 6:11-7:4, Fatherly advice
Paul is writing to us as his children.  Why would a father be especially concerned about our relationship with darkness?  How is God revealing to you both darkness and light?

Thursday: 2 Corinthians 8:1-15, God’s provision
The Macedonians were rich even though they thought themselves poor.  How have you experienced Macedonian style grace?  In what ways did the teaching about grace gifts in Romans 12 help you share your gift generously?

Friday: 2 Corinthians 8:16-9:5, Proof of our love
Paul is clear that generosity is proof (a proof?) of our love.  What opportunities for generosity is God placing in your life?  When did you experience this kind of generosity from a brother or sister?

Saturday: 2 Corinthians 9:6-15, Generosity and Thanksgiving
Yes, cheerful generosity in our lives lead others to thanksgiving!  When have you experienced joy in an opportunity to be generous?  How have you been able to overcome circumstances in your generosity?

Living Sacrifices

Living Sacrifices audio

Living Sacrifices

Romans 12:1-2 (p. 1763)
November 5, 2017                                                    

Therefore, I urge you, in view of God’s mercy,
to offer your bodies as living sacrifices,
holy and pleasing to God – this is your spiritual
act of worship.  Do not conform any longer
to the pattern of this world, but be transformed
by the renewing of your mind.
Romans 12:1-2

Text and Context

It does not, therefore, depend on man’s desire of effort,
but on God’s mercy.
Romans 9:16

  1. The “therefore” is about _________________ (plural)
  2. The imperative begins in the _______________
  3. My worship is also my _________________

Living sacrifices

The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit;
a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.
Psalm 51:17 (p. 890)

  1. Even living sacrifices have ______________
  2. Holiness is a _____________________ issue
  3. Sacrificial living is ____________________

The world

 Do not love the world or anything in the world.
If anyone loves the world, the love of the Father is not in him.
1 John 2:15 (p. 1900)

Something to . . . .

  1. Stop:_____________________________________
  2. Continue: ____________________________________

God wants me to know . . . .

 Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is –
his good, pleasing and perfect will.
Romans 12:2b (see Ephesians 5:10, p. 1822)

  1. _______________ precedes __________________
  2. God’s will really is ____________________
  3. I don’t know the pleasure until I _______________

Romans 12:1-2 from Hendriksen’s Romans

I exhort you, therefore, brothers, in view of God’s great mercy, to offer yourselves as sacrifices, living, holy, and well-pleasing to God, (which is) your spiritual worship. And stop allowing yourselves to be fashioned after the pattern of this (evil) age, but continue to let yourselves be transformed by the renewing of your mind, so that you may prove what is the will of God, namely, that which is good and well-pleasing and perfect.[1]

 

More study resources for Romans 12

Tim Browning’s messages at https://www.monergism.com
/thethreshold/articles/onsite/mp3/romans_browningpdf.html

Bob Deffinbaugh’s  sermon “Road to Renewal” at https://bible.org/seriespage/29-road-renewal-romans-121-2

Ligon Duncan’s messages at http://www.fpcjackson.org/resource-library/sermons/greetings-from-an-apostle

Michael Horton’s “Romans from 30,000 Feet” from “An Overview of the Book of Romans”, http://www.reformationtheology.com/
2011/04/romans_from_30000_feet_by_mich.php

Sinclair Ferguson’s “The Great Exchanges of Romans” at
http://www.ligonier.org/blog/great-exchanges-romans/

F.F. Bruce’s paraphrase of Romans at https://biblicalstudies.org.
uk/pdf/eq/1958-2_bruce.pdf
  or Paternoster Press (1965); Paul: Apostle of the Heart Set Free (Eerdmans, 1977); and The Epistle of Paul to the Romans (Eerdmans, 1963).  I like Bruce’s poem on page 162:
To run and work the law commands,
Yet gives me neither feet nor hands;
But better news the gospel brings:
It bids me fly and gives me wings.

Tim Keller’s Romans For You (The Good Book, 2014).

William Hendriksen’s Romans in BNTC (Baker Books, 1980).

James Boice’s Romans, Volume 4, (Baker Books, 1991).  See
p. 1515 for Boice’s argument for “reasonable” over “spiritual”.

Earl Palmer’s Romans series notes “The Greatest Book”, Winter 2002, University Presbyterian Church, Seattle, Washington.

[1] Hendriksen, W., & Kistemaker, S. J. (1953-2001). Vol. 12-13: Exposition of Paul’s Epistle to the Romans. New Testament Commentary (399–401). Grand Rapids: Baker Book House.

 

The Fifth Reformation audio

The Fifth Reformation

Romans 12:3-8 (p. 1763)                                                                      November 12, 2017    

. . . so in Christ we who are many form one body,
and each member belongs to all the others.  
Romans 12:5

Cogito ergo sum

Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the measure of faith God has given you.
Romans 12:3

  1. Renewal changes how I think about MYSELF
  2. Not “high thinking”: ______________________________________________________
  3. But “right thinking”: ____________________________________________________

A theology of “membership”

Just as each of us has one body with many members,
and all these members do not have the same function,
so in Christ, we who are many form one body,
and each member belongs to all the others.   
Romans 12:4-5

  1. Membership is  ORGANIC
  2. Membership reflects  DIVERSITY  and  UNITY  (one head, but lots of different graces!)
  3. Membership means NOT JUST BELONGING TO, BUT DEPENDENT ON EACH OTHER

The same gifts today

We all have different gifts, according to the grace given us . . . .     Romans 12:6

 

Prophesying: _________________________              Serving: _____________________________

 

Teaching: ____________________________             Contributing: _________________________

 

Encouraging: _________________________             Leadership: __________________________

 

Showing mercy: ______________________

 

Two application questions

  1. The LOVE  Test

If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love,
I am only a resounding gong or a clanging cymbal.
If I have the gift of prophecy and can fathom all mysteries and all knowledge,
and if I have a faith that can move mountains, but have not love, I am nothing.
  If I give all I possess to the poor and surrender my body to the flames,
but have not love, I gain nothing.

1 Corinthians 13:1

Since you are eager to have spiritual gifts, try to excel in gifts that build up the church.
1 Corinthians 14:13

  1. The FLAME  Test

For this reason I remind you to fan into flame the gift of God which is in you through the laying on of my hands.  For God did not give us a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power, of love, and of self-discipline.
2
Timothy 1:6

More study resources for Romans 12

Tim Browning’s message “Not Puffed Up” at https://www.
monergism.com/thethreshold/articles/onsite/mp3/076%20Romans%2012.03-08.pdf

Bob Deffinbaugh’s  sermon “Straight Thinking” at https://
bible.org/seriespage/30-thinking-straight-about-spiritual-gifts-romans-123-8

Ligon Duncan’s message “A Call to Humility” at https://www.fpcjackson.org/resource-library/sermons/a-call-to-humility-and-service

Michael Horton’s “Romans from 30,000 Feet” from “An Overview of the Book of Romans”, http://www.reformationtheology.com/2011/04/romans_from_30000_feet_by_mich.php

Sinclair Ferguson’s “The Great Exchanges” at http://www.ligonier.org/blog/great-exchanges-romans/

F.F. Bruce’s paraphrase of Romans at https://biblicalstudies.org.uk/pdf/eq/1958-2_bruce.pdf  or Paternoster Press (1965); Paul: Apostle of the Heart Set Free (Eerdmans, 1977); and The Epistle of Paul to the Romans (Eerdmans, 1963).

Tim Keller’s Romans For You (The Good Book, 2014).

William Hendriksen’s Romans in BNTC (Baker Books, 1980).

James Boice’s Romans, Volume 4, (Baker Books, 1991).

Earl Palmer’s Romans series notes “The Greatest Book”, Winter 2002, University Presbyterian Church, Seattle, Washington.

Reading this week: Changing the Story again

This is the second week of our World Hunger Campaign week, so I’ve selected another series of  passages from World Renew’s devotional, this week from the “Family Devotions” side.  For more information on this year’s campaign or to receive these devotions online, visit World Renew at worldrenew.net. 

Monday: Philippians 4:19, God will supply
Generosity is always a celebration of God’s provision for us (see 2 Corinthians 8-9).  What special provision from God are you celebrating?  How has that provision led to generosity?

Tuesday: James 1:27, True Religion
Religion can be a problem, but at its best religion turns our attention outward – to Jesus’ righteousness and the needs of others.  When have you experienced this outward focus of your religion?  Who are the widows and orphans in your life?

Wednesday: Genesis 1:27, God’s image in everyone!
Yes, everyone!  And we honor God when we honor and care for his image wherever we encounter it. The church has always held that we encounter God’s image especially in the vulnerable.  When have you most recently encountered God’s image in the needs of another?

Thursday: Deuteronomy 6:10-12, How easy to forget
This is the tyranny of the too much.  Places and things have always distracted God’s people from worship and generosity.  How do you balance resting in God’s provision with need to be daily (in the Matthew 6 sense) dependent on him?

Friday: Leviticus 23:22, Leaving room to meet needs
Generosity is also a discipline, affecting even the way we harvest our fields.  In your busy life, where are you leaving room for God to meet needs through his provision?

Saturday: Psalm 146:6-7, God has created more than enough
God deals in surplus, surplus grace and surplus food.   How does your experience of the first affect your experience of the second?  How does a high view of God as Creator also lead us toward lifestyles of justice?

Reformation Day message

On October 29, the Christian Reformed churches around the Skagit Valley met at First CRC for a Reformation Day Service, this year remembering the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s “Faith Alone” challenge to the church.  That’s 500 years of being Reformed and still reforming!  Rev. Ken Koeman shared a wonderful message from Romans 5, When he Right Things Are Right, and gave permission for us to share his message with our congregations.  I hope you are as blessed by Ken’s sermon as we who were in attendance were.  Here is the text of the message.  Hope to have the audio up soon.  To God alone be the glory!

If The Right Things Are Right

Reading this week: Changing the Story

This is World Hunger Campaign week, so I’ve selected the passages out of World Renew’s devotional to direct our reading and devotions this week.  For more information on this year’s campaign or to receive these devotions online, visit World Renew at worldrenew.net. 

Monday: Psalm 103, Singing God’s Love and Justice
Not only good for Communion, this Psalm is a reminder of God’s compassion for the world.  How have you experienced that compassion?  What song comes to your mind right now?

Tuesday: Ephesians 5, Justice begins at home
Being filled by the Spirit makes a difference.  In what ways does your family reflect a changed story?  How might that change bless the families you are touching?

Wednesday: Ephesians 3:14-21, Encouragement
This is my favorite prayer in the Bible!  Which stories of God’s love are you most engaged with now?  How have these stories of God’s love encouraged you?  How has this prayer been effective in your life?

Thursday: Isaiah 61:1-3; Luke 4:14-21, The Crown of Beauty
Jesus’ ministry included those left out, marginalized.  Where is our church active in the “crown of beauty” business?  To whom is God calling you to bring this whole gospel ministry?

Friday: Psalm 15; Micah 6:1-8, Integrity and Gospel
God has always called those invited into his presence to walk blameless.  To what integrity questions in the church is God turning your attention?  in your life?  How has integrity led you to a deeper experience into God’s sanctuary?

Saturday: Luke 10:25-37, My Neighbors
God is in the business of expanding our “neighborhoods.”  How has your neighborhood been growing?  What new neighbors is God leading into your life?  How is God answering the question “Who’s our neighbor?” in the life of our church?

Reading this week: God’s Glory in the Psalms

In these Psalms, our attention is turned towards God’s glory, the “weight” of attributes, in almost every stanza.  Sometimes we are invited to stand in awe, and at other times we are invited to share in the honor of God’s glory.

Monday: Psalm 8, Crowned with glory and honor
In this Psalm our gaze is directed upward to the heavens and sideward to our neighbor as we see God’s glory exposed.  How is God’s glory being displayed in your life?

Tuesday: Psalm 24, The King of Glory
This traditional Reformation Psalm invites us into a corporate experience of God’s glory as we enter his “holy place”.  There is an incredible blessing the one who is prepared to ascend into God’s presence.  What are doing to prepare to enter into God’s presence daily?  weekly?  eternally?

Wednesday: Psalm 66, Sing and shout the glory of God’s name
We are invited to join creation in exalting the glory of God even we are led through “fire and water” – always with the promise of God’s abundance (see 66:12).  When did you last praise God even in the presence of troubles?

Thursday: Psalm 108, Glory covering “all the earth”
This Psalm is both praise and a prayer as David reflects on God’s faithfulness.  Where have you most powerfully observed God’s glory being revealed on, or his kingdom breaking into, this earth?

Friday: Psalm 34, Glorify the Lord with me
This is another Psalm celebrating the glory of God’s presence.  How have you experienced the wonderful promise that God hears and saves even the poor man?  When did God make this promise real in your life?

Saturday: Psalm 149, The glory of all the saints
Our glory, and God’s delight, is to see his will being expressed through his people.  God really takes delight (see 149:4) in us!  When have you felt this delight of God?  How have you “inflicted vengeance” on the work of Satan in the world?

Only Jesus

Only Jesus

Hebrews 1:1-4 (p. 1862)                                                                            October 22, 2017    

The Son is the radiance of God’s glory
and the exact representation of his being,
sustaining all things by his powerful word.

Hebrews 1:3


Intro:            1) VERY short history of the author and text of Hebrews,
Πολυμερῶς καὶ πολυτρόπως πάλαι ὁ θεὸς
2) καὶ χαρακτὴρ τῆς ὑποστάσεως
hupostasis = “what stands underneath” (“substance” in Latin)
— but confidence, assurance (Hebrews 3:14, 11:1)
might be better translation

Why is Jesus better?

In the past God spoke to our forefathers through the prophets
at various times and in various ways,
but in these last days he has spoken to us by his Son . . . .
Hebrews 1:1-2 (p. 1859)

  1. Jesus is how God SPEAKS
  2. Jesus is the only IMPRESSION
  3. The POWER of Jesus’ word and name

Rediscovering Jesus

The Jews look for miraculous signs and Greeks look for wisdom,
but we preach Christ crucified . . . .
1 Corinthians 1:23 (p. 1736)

  1. Preaching: _______________________________________________________
  2. Church: _________________________________________________________
  3. Salvation: ______________________________________________________

Meeting Jesus today

. . . then know this, you and all the people of Israel:
It is by the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth,
whom you crucified but whom God raised from the dead,
that this man stands before you healed . . . .
Salvation is found in no one else for there is no other name under heaven
given to men by which we must be saved.
Acts 4:8-12 (p. 1696)

  1. Meet Jesus at  THE CROSS (his righteousness and my sin)
  2. Meet Jesus when  I SPEAK HIS NAME
  3. Meet Jesus in  HIS WORD à PREACHING AND PERSONAL ENCOUNTER
  4. Meet Jesus through  HIS BODY

More resources for studying solus Christus

Kevin deYoung’s Taking God at His Word (Crossway, 2014).  This is where I get the “knowable, necessary and enough” paradigm for thinking about the sufficiency of Scripture.

John Calvin’s Institutes, “Redemption to be sought in Christ alone” at http://www.ccel.org/print/calvin
/institutes/iv.vii

Michael Horton’s essay “Preaching Christ Alone” at https://www.monergism.com/preaching-christ-alone

Calvin Theological Seminary’s Forum (Spring 2017), “500 Years of the Reformation”.

Ligon Duncan’s “The Great Revelation of God” series at https://www.fpcjackson.org/resource-library/sermons/jesus-the-great-revelation-of-god-part-1

Ligonier Ministries’ “Grace Alone” devotion at http://www.ligonier.org/learn/devotionals/grace-alone/

“Seven Things” blog at https://australia.thegospelcoalition.org/article/sola-scriptura-seven-things-it-is-and-isnt

 

ὑπόστασις

hypostasis, substance, firmness, confidence, collection of documents establishing ownership, guarantee, proof

→see also πίστις

hypostasis, S 5287; TDNT 8.572–589; EDNT 3.406–407; NIDNTT 1.710–714; MM 659–660; L&N 31.84, 58.1; BAGD 847

The usual Latin equivalent of hypo-stasis is sub-stantia, which in philosophical terms means the essence of an entity, that which is hidden beneath the appearances. This meaning, however, is not attested in the nt, apart from Heb 1:3, where the Son is the imprint or effigy of the substance of the Father.

In an ethical sense, hypostasis refers to what is deep in the heart—firmness, calm, confidence, courage; hence the meaning “hope” or psychological and moral support in Ruth 1:12; Ezek 19:5; Ps 39:7 (Hebrew tôḥeleṯ) and “assurance”—probably the meaning in 2 Cor 9:4; 11:17, and certainly in Heb 3:14—“if we hold our initial confidence (literally, the beginning of assurance) till the end.” It is more difficult to translate Heb 11:1, estin de pistis elpizomenōn hypostasis, where the Vulgate simply transcribes the word in question (“Fides est substantia sperandarum rerum”) and most moderns translate it “assurance or solid confidence.” But in the papyri our noun is usually used for property, for a right of possession: “without risk for myself and my property” (P.Oxy. 138, 26; 1981, 27; 2478, 28; P.Berl.Zill. 6, 4; SB 8986, 22; 9463, 6; 9566, 10); “the scribe attributed more land to me than I actually own” (P.Oxy. 488, 17; cf. P.Wisc. 61, 15); in an account from the fourth century, “produce from a property of twenty-four arourai.Hypostasis is also used for the contents of a house. The commentaries of the church fathers and the medievals followed this line of interpretation: faith contains the substance of eternal life, which is the prima inchoatio (first beginning) of the object of hope. It already possesses that hope, perhaps only faintly, but nevertheless in its true essence.

This nuance of anticipation can be narrowed down further. Hypostasis means point of departure, beginning (Diodorus Siculus 1.66), provision for the future (P.Panop.Beatty 1, 269; P.Tebt. 336; 7; P.Stras. 309, verso 2; P.Fay. 343; SB 7360, 12), offer (P.Panop.Beatty 2, 144, 158), commitment or guarantee. According to the edict of Mettius Rufus, all owners of building and land have to have deeds on record establishing their property rights.12 Thus a hypostasis is a collection of documents establishing ownership, deposited in the archives and proving the owner’s rights; hence it is a guarantee for the future. Moulton-Milligan are right to translate Heb 11:1 “Faith is the title-deed of things hoped for.” This was also the interpretation of the Peshitta: pyso, “guarantee, proof.” Faith is a title of ownership on property that is in the future.[1]

[1] Spicq, C., & Ernest, J. D. (1994). Vol. 3: Theological lexicon of the New Testament (421–423). Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers.

Reading this week: Solus Christus in Hebrews

The author of Hebrews, whoever he or she may be, presents Jesus as superior to the old.  This “new and better” Jesus changed everything in the church in the First Century. And during the Reformation, a new understanding of the person and work of Jesus changed the way we preached, we worshiped and we lived.  In Hebrews we meet that Jesus, and he again will reform us!

Monday: Hebrews 2:1-18, Jesus greater than the angels
The angels were the ones who brought us the word of God according to Philo, an influential First Century philosopher.  But the church didn’t need Philo – she had the word directly through Jesus.  When have you most clearly heard Jesus speak through his word?  What hearing disciplines are you building today?

Tuesday: Hebrews 3:1-19, Jesus greater than Moses
Moses met face to face with God, but he would have traded all that glory for a moment with the Son.  How are you taking advantage of the great privilege of meeting with Jesus?  What “meeting with Jesus” disciplines are you working on right now?

Wednesday: Hebrews 4:1-13, Jesus’ rest superior to Sabbath rest
God’s people have always enjoyed the gift of Sabbath rest, but there is a greater gift waiting when we meet Jesus.  How have the rhythms and disciplines of Sabbath helped you say “yes” to what is important and “no” to what our culture says is important?

Thursday: Hebrew 4:14-5:10, Jesus the greatest priest
Having Jesus as our Priest allows us to “hold firmly to the faith we profess.”  When have been most confident in your faith?  When has Jesus’ priestly work been most evident in your life?

Friday: Hebrews 9:11-28, Jesus the greater sacrifice
Jesus is both Priest and Sacrifice.  Which of these roles is most central to your thinking about Jesus?  When have you seen Jesus’ sacrificial work most evident in your life?  What does Jesus’ sacrifice on the cross provide to you that nothing else could?

Saturday: Hebrews 10:19-39, Jesus the only way to God
What other potential ways into that “Most Holy Place” (where God’s redemption work is done!) have you encountered?  How have you explained the exclusivity of the Jesus way to a skeptic?  Who or what is helping you hold on to your confidence in the Jesus way?